Wednesday, 15 April 2015

9 Things My Parents Taught Me | #IrishBlogCollab | Week 2



Another week, another #IrishBlogCollab post. I thoroughly enjoyed last week's one and seeing every one of the ladies come together and have a gander at each other's posts was really enjoyable. I have a feeling that this post will be of interest to a lot of you, particularly my fellow Irish folk.

Whether you would admit it or not, we are so easily influenced by our parents/guardians/grandparents. They have raised us, fed us, clothed us and protected us along for the duration of our lives so there is bound to be room for a certain level of recognition there is there not? My parents have of course equipped me with the skills and know-how to get around my life, and indeed many a life lesson - but of course there is other essentials that are vital to keeping your two feet on the ground. I am proud to say I have yet to commit the "leaving the immersion on" fiasco - so I seem to be listening to a lot of what is being said! Read below to see if you can relate to any of what I have come up with.

"I WANT TO SEE EVERY MORSEL OF THAT DINNER GONE"
Ah, the dinner is one of the most important times of the day for nearly every Irish household. It's the general consensus that you can do just about anything or go anywhere as long as you have had your dinner of course. It is generally thought that no harm will come your way as soon as "you've got some food in your belly to do you the night".

"LEAVE THE GOOD BISCUITS FOR THE VISITORS"
As you can see, food is a common commodity when it comes to Irish parents. There is "the cupboard" or a part of the cupboard that is set aside for the finer cuisine of life designated to people who probably who won't even arrive. You don't question the cupboard, but it is in your best interest to backtrack fairly lively if you find yourself absentmindedly wandering your way to the sweet waft that demands your senses - your Mammy wouldn't be impressed.

"GIVE YOURSELF PLENTY OF TIME"
Many Irish parents, including my own - do not believe, and even condemn the notion of rushing anywhere. Hence, giving yourself "plenty of time" will make sure you reach your destination, rush free and on time - win win?

"MAKE SURE TO CHECK IN AS SOON AS YE'VE LANDED"
The famous check in merely involves a quick phone call to the folks as soon as you've "landed" somewhere, particularly of foreign lands. The conversation will have to include a step by step description of your journey, what time you "landed", what you had to eat that day (couldn't be travelling on a hungry belly now could you?), what your plans are for the following day and is the accommodation nice (and a description of the place, of course). And until as you have that information to hand, there really is no point in ringing in the first place. Failure to successfully complete the "check in" is a shortcoming of character and "cop on" on your side, I'm afraid to say.

"ALWAYS GIVE THE SALUTE"
Giving the "salute" on the roads, more importantly within your own community is a vital part of keeping the peace amongst villagers (that may be a slight exaggeration). I have seen my mother and father give the salute thousands of times over the years and I do it subconsciously myself, too. A car pulls in to let you pass, salute, a pedestrian pulls in to let your car through, salute, you pass someone you know on the road, what do you do? You give the salute.

It comes down to basic manners within your own community. I would rather be known for falling into ditches on my walks out rather than being known for not giving the salute - if I'm being honest.

"NEVER GO OUTSIDE WITH A WET HEAD"
"Do you want a creak in your neck?" is closely followed by this statement. It's fairly self explanatory, but it has been something that was lamented to me for years - I now find myself saying this to my own friends and other family.

"WHERE EVER YOU'RE GOING, BE SURE TO WEAR PLENTY GEAR"
 Any time I have walked out the door with only 3-4 layers on, my mother has always been on the case before I set foot outside. Coats, jackets, fleeces, hats - you name at get fired from the utility. I rarely encounter this now. I usually bring an extra layer or two more than needed to keep the peace and ask "Do you think this will be warm enough?" Everyone's happy.

"HAVE YOU CHECKED THE WEATHER BEFORE YOUR GALAVANTING?"
"Intermittent clouds/scattered showers/patches of mist and fog/gale force winds" may stop you in your tracks fairly lively. Unless you are seeking to insult your parents' intelligence, it would be in your best interest to check the weather before you even THINK of going anywhere.

"WHAT'S GOOD FOR YOU WON'T PASS YOU BY"
My parents have always been encouraging and supportive alone the way, of course. Though with this, they don't like to add any pressure on, "sure what's the point of that, tell me now?" is what's usually said in our house. As long as you've tried your best in everything, that's all that matters.

Wasn't that a lovely note to finish up on?

I thoroughly enjoyed putting together this week's post! Can you relate to some of these? What have your parents taught you?

Don't forget to keep up to date with us using the #IrishBlogCollab hashtag.

#IRISHBLOGCOLLAB LADIES:
Zoe - I Believe in Romeo
Denise - Dee-Termined to Glam and Glow
Cathryn - What Kate Loves
Cat - Mentally Beautiful
Marie - The Beaut Mum
Lara - The Love Song of Fashion
Eimear - Chirps from a Little Red Hen
Maeve - Thrift O'Clock
Sharon - Behind Green Eyes

7 comments:

  1. Great post!!! Catherine you "hit the nail on the head" with all of the Irishisms! Every Irish Mammy and Irish Household can relate to your post!

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  2. Fantastic post Catherine, so funny! Being Irish I can definitely relate to these, especially the saluting, weather appropriate clothing choices that will please the parents & making sure to 'check in'! :')

    Maeve // Thrift O'Clock

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    1. Thanks Maeve! I went to Westport for a night (which is only an hour away) and failed to meet the check in, when I arrived home the mammy wasn't happy at all!

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  3. 'Always give the salute' - so true! I'm in stitches here! x

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    1. It's an integral part of everyday life down here!

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  4. Ah great post Catherine!! I HAVE left the immersion on (overnight once, it's a wonder I wasn't asked to leave). The best thing about having my own house now is that I get to buy the fancy biscuits for ME! Hehe :)

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